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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
data move fearlessly through the clouds means more than ever. >>> pakistan is detaining a doctor suspected of working with the cia in an elaborate ruse. it was reportedly designed to get dna samples from people inside the compound where it turned out osama bin laden was living. joining us now from islamabad, resa saya. walk us through what happened here. this is a pretty intriguing spy story, if you will. what happened? >> reporter: yeah, it's a fascinating glimpse, look, at the lengths the cia was going to find the location of bin laden in abbottabad. a pakistani security official is telling us the pakistani doctor is in custody suspected of helping the cia set up an intricate plot to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden. according to this official he set up a free vaccination campaign to offer a free vaccination to the people of abbottabad where bin laden's compound was located. this doctor hired two nurses going around town from house to house, the plan towas to find t bin laden kids, to match their dna with the dna of bin laudedl sister who passed away in massachuset ma
after the entire terrorist infrastructure inside of pakistan. >>dave: are we taking our eye off the ball? all we hear about is al qaeda? panetta and general petraeus saying we close to finishing them off. is that a public perception? >>guest: i'm concerned by the fact they do recite that there is a war on al qaeda and there are other groups like the indian mujaheddin who is in the to be a front for l.e.t. which operates openly in pakistan. a vast array of groups with the same ideology of al qaeda and we have to go after them just as much. >>dave: what role did pakistani play in this and are they our friend or foe? >>guest: the l.e.t. operate a huge infrastructure in magazine stage and bragged they have 200 facilities operating in pakistan and they have charity schools and pakistan does nothing about it. >>dave: and the funding of the military, we have cut off the military funding. is pakistan saying you need to start the money flowing again here? or we will in the help you? >>guest: that is the direction they are moving. i expect a rise in the attacks in afghanistan or to bring that mess
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
sightedness of it gets us in more trouble than anything else. pertaining to pakistan, having grown up there in the earlier years of my life, and it cannot tell you the immense good will that was there for the americans in the 1980's when we were fighting the soviets and freedom fighters of that time. the day the soviets left, the very next day everyone packed up their bags and left. that region was left with the master deal with on its own. come 9/11, all of a sudden they want that place to be fixed. well, no one was there for 13-14 years. we need to have a longer-term view. if we do not do that, there is no way we can solve our problems. thank you and i will listen offline. host: that may be a way to look at the broader question before we wrap up, but the remainder of the middle east long term. guest: this gets to the issue we spoke about earlier about whether the u.s. is going to support the democratic process in the future. i think the caller is right certainly in the case of pakistan and afghanistan. the united states lost sight of the importance of the region after the soviet the
talks, and talk to journalist pam constable about her new book on pakistan. i'm judy woodruff. >> lehrer: and i'm jim lehrer. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online, and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: chevron. we may have more in common than you think. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. ♪ >> union bank has put i
afghanistan, pakistan. you're reading a couple pieces in the "new york times." now it's spreading to all of these different countries and one that really jumped off the page for me, drone attacks in somalia. >> joining us, jeremy scahill, on the cia secret sites in somalia, jeremy, the secret training programs and secret prisons out of somalia is part of your reporting there. how big a threat are these terrorist group there's? >> we should say first of all president obama campaigned on a promise to go up against these bush era policies declaring war on the world, running secret sites, torturing prisoners. deeply involved in an underground dungeon officially run by the somali national security agency, but their salaries are paid by the cia directly. in fact, one somali agent described thousand hairli ed ho and paid by u.s. agents and the u.s. is interrogating prisoners, including those rendered by the kenyan government, snatched off the streets in nairobi based on u.s. intelligence and taken to this secret prison and interrogated. it goes against the president's ordered he signed in janua
persecuted in places like pakistan, and we help christians who are suffering throughout the middle east. >> how do you do that? >> none of your business. >> isn't it anyone's business that donates to you? >> of course. but, you see, a lot of the times, if you disclose information of who you are helping, it ends up biting them. >> reporter: he leads us to his manager who was down the hall selling the anti-islam books. when cnn had questions about the high ranks on the board of advisers, he said to get the number from davies. >> can you tell us who they are? >> off the top of my head, yes. let me see. i am trying to think. the names have gone blank. they will come back to me in a second. major general -- ah, i can't -- the four-star -- there was a three-star general at the air force, irish name, thomas -- i usually know these by hearts. >> reporter: davies did come up with one name, a pilot but no contact details despite repeated requests from cnn. we made calls to the individual anyway, but he never called us back. the group's public tax forms lists only davies and a real estate develope
certainly hurt the al-qaeda terrorist organization, in pakistan and afghanistan. but anwar al-awlaki is alive and well in yemen and he is planning additional attacks against americans. is the franchise there now the lead in al-qaeda and how dangerous and what can we do? >> al-qaeda is somewhat diffuse in the islamist most of the time. yemen a fertile ground. it does seem to be emerging as headquarters of sorts. yemen as a state doesn't exist right now. it was an iffy topic when it had a president but it essentially doesn't right now. so al-qaeda finding an open door. president obama came out and said the tide of war is receding but nobody gave that message to the islamist terrorists. we this had the christmas day bombing, not the one on the flight but the on other one on fed ex shipments. >> gregg: speaking of terrorists let's talk about libya and moammar khadafy who says he is willing to talk to america but he refuses to give up his position. so what is the point of talking to the guy? >> this has been going for five months. people have said that khadafy is losing or close to
into the gulf of oman, towards pakistan. it is very important. these two monarchies have done everything possible to crush any sign or effort of reform or agitation for reform. in the case of the saudi arabia, there were quite successful in doing this. some of the liberal saudis tried to have a so-called day of raids on march 11. -- a so-called day of rage on march 11. exactly one person showed up in riyadh. that person was swamped by journalists. but 17,000 people had signed up on the facebook page to come out and participate in the day of rage. some shiites in the eastern province show that the day before and had their demonstration. but, basically, the saudis have been able to mobilize not only the threat of security forces cracking down on anybody who demonstrates, the got the religious establishment making any kind of demonstrations religiously forbidden. they put pressure on families to keep their kids at home. and they succeeded. in the case of bahrain, it was much more messy, and you have a shiite majority there of 70% may become a 65% to 75%. and they were on their way to probab
campaign been ongoing in pakistan and some cases yemen, we've taken out something like 1200 fighters from al qaeda including senior leaders. jon: right. >> this is all good news. but again the ideology of radical islam lives on and so do these affiliate groups. that is the challenge ahead of us. jon: if you take out those leaders, and we have been very successful in doing that, if you take out people who have experience going back to the russian-afghan war, take out the people who know how to motivate and organization and maybe build a bomb be, pretty soon you're left with bunch of 18, 20-year-old kids who may have the desire but don't necessarily have the knowledge to continue terrorism campaign? >> well, you know i think you could make that argument but you could also argue you have a number of people who gained experience in afghanistan. people who have gained experience and by the way, fighting in this more recent war, not in the war in the 1980s against the soviets. but rather fighting against the united states and allied forces. you have people that have had experience in iraq and o
, pakistan, with the veterans cost and all that, tax cuts, medicare part d, which none of those are paid for, $6.3 trillion, cutting the deficit down to $7.6. last thing here, if the viewers would go to the "wall street journal" january 9, 2009, bush on jobs, you will see where a man wrote an article, look down at the bottom and there is an actual chart that says what the president's job performance from 1945 to 2008 and it only reason i didn't include obama, he has not completed his full term. i have five more seconds. six republican president necessary control for 36 years and created jobs, which is $980,500 an average. >> put a lot out there, what do you want to respond to? >> $14.3 trillion is the national debt ceiling right now. we have exceeded that and that is what the fight is and on congress, whether or not to increase the national debt ceiling that has never, we never not increased the debt ceiling and look, there are a lot of drivers to this. there is increased cost in medicare, there is defense spending, there is lower tax revenue, there was tax cuts instituted in 2001 -- in 2001
in pakistan just an hour away from islama bad. they raided the congresswoman pound. and in the burst of gun fire, the al qaeda leader was killed and his body buried at sea. as america celebrated and the world wondered about retaliation . >> we should remember in particular the brave servicemen and women who gave their lives against terrorism across the world and pay tribute to the british forces who played their part over the last decade in the hunt for bin laden. he was responsible for 9/11. which was not only a horrific killing of americans but remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. as a head of a family group of flight 93 put it, we are willing to make an exception in this case. he was evil personified and our world is a better place without him. >> while understanding the satisfaction and elation of those who lost family members on 9/11, my friend agrees that the sober reality is that some things are unchanged by the death of osama bin laden. the threat remains and jihad must be confronted and adequate resources, effective international cooperation
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)